WORSHIP WITH US

SUNDAYS 9am 11am 1pm     WEDNESDAYS 7:15pm

WORSHIP WITH US

SUNDAYS 9am 11am 1pm     WEDNESDAYS 7:15pm
WATCH
CONNECT
VOLUNTEER
 
Pledge Now Gods Guarantee Logo Transparent Support CoH

2016 Daily Devotions

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

by
Weber Baker

Scripture
In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, ‘Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.’ When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, ‘In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:
“And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
     are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
     who is to shepherd my people Israel.” ’

Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, ‘Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage.’ When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure-chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.

Matthew 1-6-16

A Word of Hope
Weber Baker Today is the Feast of the Epiphany. It is the day we remember the arrival of the three wise men (or Magi - magicians) who came from the east following a star to which their magical intuition had led them. They came bearing gifts that have been said represent the Christ - gold for kingship, incense for deity, myrrh foreshadowing his death.

Is this story history or metaphorical storytelling? It is hard to believe that this is a literally true story. A richly appointed retinue of Magi, coming from the East, which would be India or Persia perhaps, passing through a small town like Bethlehem went unnoticed? Just twelve days before the sky was filled with “a heavenly host” that drew the attention of shepherds but not one city official or Roman census taker. All this while people from all over Judea were moving to their homes to be counted for the census.

When I was in Catholic school we were taught that the story was both and that the metaphor was the “epiphany” of the Magi that they had found the new ruler of the Jews. The world outside of Judaism recognized this new ruler. It was, I was taught, a more important holiday for early Christians than Christmas. This epiphany was that the baby they found had come for and was recognized by all people.

Merriam-Webster gives the second meaning of the word epiphany as “a moment in which you suddenly see or understand something in a new or very clear way”. (The first definition is this holiday). This second definition as the origin of the name of this feast causes me to think. This was not an epiphany for these travelers. They set out looking for the new Jewish ruler. It was not a moment of new understanding for them; at least as the story is presented. And they did not convert to Judaism or stick around to become the first Christians. They continued on their path, having found the one sent to be God among us.

So who has had an epiphany?

Earlier in Matthew Joseph has a dream in which he is told to wed Mary; that the son she would bear would be the savior of his people. Who are these people? Of whom might a carpenter like Joseph be most aware? Why the nation of Israel, the Jews all around.

Not mentioned in Matthew, but in Luke is how Mary has been told her child would sit on the throne of David. Again, a ruler of the Jews.

So I think the epiphany here is not something the there travelers have. I think it is Mary and Joseph who have come to a new understanding. This story represents the realization that this child is more than a ruler of the Jews. Mary and Joseph, through their well recounted genealogy, stand in for the nation of Israel. Matthew, whose gospel is aimed at a Jewish audience, is setting the stage for Jewish readers of the Gospel to recognize this child as not just theirs, but that the child is for all mankind.

Prayer
Emmanuel, God with us, help me remember that You are here among us, within us, working through us. Help me remember most that ‘us’ is ‘all of us’; not just those who follow You through the path set by Jesus; but all whose paths lead to the Justice and Peace that comes from you. Amen.

If you would like to receive the Cathedral of Hope Devotion we would love to be able to send it to you directly. Sign up today to receive your own copy.

Support Cathedral of Hope

Tuesday, January 5, 2015

by
Dan Peeler
Order of St. Francis and St. Clare
Minister for Children and Families

Scripture
“I know all the birds of the mountains
And every wild creature is in my care.”

Psalm 50.1

A Word of Hope
Dan Peeler It has been 12 days since Christmas Day on the 25th of December, but you still have a chance to say Merry Christmas all day today since it is the last day of the Christmastide Season. The evening of this day is called 12th Night, a celebration and feast in some parts of the world, marking the final night of the twelve days of Christmas, the eve of the Epiphany, and medieval British traditions appointed two birds to symbolize both this day and the January 6 arrival of the Magi.

In most European folk traditions, the wren, a small and humble grey brown bird, is the symbol of the departed old year and the bright, red breasted robin is the symbol of the new hope, the coming of the influential, and we are to assume, colorful magi who arrived in Bethlehem to worship and adore the Christ Child on behalf of the entire gentile world. The robin’s migration also ushered in the bright light of the world as the long dark days of winter were grinding to a close. Medieval Christians were familiar, too, with the old legend of the robin’s red breast being God’s reward for its stalwartly fanning the embers of the stable’s fire all night in order to provide warmth for the Christ Child.

Birds, from the partridge to the seven swans comprised half of all the gifts my true love gave to me on the 12 Days of Christmas, but their importance as symbols trace back to the teachings of Jesus, who obviously had great respect and much knowledge of our avian friends. His birds of the air stories featured ravens, sparrows, roosters, doves, pigeons and he even compared himself to a mother hen: “Jerusalem, Jerusalem!...I have often wanted to gather your people, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings.” Luke 13.34.

Prayer
May I use this Twelfth Night as a good time of the year to remember and honor all the wrens and robins of my own life, and respect them as Jesus did, as quiet memories of the past and vibrant hopes for the future.

If you would like to receive the Cathedral of Hope Devotion we would love to be able to send it to you directly. Sign up today to receive your own copy.

Support Cathedral of Hope

Monday, January 4, 2015

by
Dan Peeler
Order of St. Francis and St. Clare
Minister for Children and Families

Scripture
“But Mary treasured all these words and pondered them in her heart”. Luke 2.19

A Word of Hope
Dan Peeler Did you know you could still be wishing everyone a Merry Christmas today? Even after the New year has begun, on this, the eleventh day of the Season of Christmastide, it is very helpful to remember that all the preparation and buildup we have shared for the last several weeks were not just for a single day of celebration that ends at midnight, December 25th. Our ancestors who originally came up with the idea of the twelve-day Christmastide season must have realized that all the words we hear every year about God manifesting Incarnate in the world should take the average person a little longer than a single day to grasp. And likewise, that the Christmas withdrawal so many of us feel is lessened if we savor the season gradually rather than devouring it in one sitting like a plump slice of pumpkin pie.

Christmastide is a good time to contemplate the symbols that still surround us; to ponder their origins. Did you know that mistletoe was thought to have eternal life since it remains green after its host tree has dropped all its leaves, and that kissing your partner under a bundle of the plants will assure that your love will last forever? -Or that holly is symbolic of Jesus' Crown of Thorns, with the red berries being the drops of blood?

A constant in the Children’s Ministry, and the most appropriate symbol of this season, graces our church year-round; the new-borns and infants who remind us we have the opportunity that Mary herself had; to be a part of nurturing, guiding and supporting a new life, believing always in the hope these tiny members of the Body of Christ have brought into our world. Being part of their lives through actions or prayer can make the joys of Christmastide last considerably longer than twelve days. So, Merry Christmastide to you and yours from the Children’s Ministry and all the staff and volunteers of the Cathedral of Hope!

Prayer
God of Wisdom, in this the New Year and Christmas Season, help us to recognize your face in the shining smiles of the youngest among us.

If you would like to receive the Cathedral of Hope Devotion we would love to be able to send it to you directly. Sign up today to receive your own copy.

Support Cathedral of Hope

Friday, January 1, 2015

by
Dan Peeler
Order of St. Francis and St. Clare
Minister for Children and Families

Scripture
“The end of all things is near; therefore be serious and discipline yourselves for the sake of your prayers. Above all, maintain constant love for one another, for love covers a multitude of sins. Be hospitable to one another without complaining. Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God, serve one another with whatever gift each of you has received.” 1 Peter 4.7-9

A Word of Hope
Dan Peeler Today, as you might have heard, is New Year’s Day; a time when we look forward to a fresh start for a hopeful future, a day to reflect on the end of yet another twelve months of our lives and a good time to remember the words if 1 Peter. The writer of the letter we call 1 Peter was a very realistic individual. Written near the end of the first century probably by one of the Apostle Paul’s followers, the brief note was sent from Rome to various church leaders in Asia Minor in order to instruct and encourage them in the last days. But it’s almost 2,000 years later and the world still hasn’t ended. What happened?

I believe the writer was realistic because he or she could look around and clearly see the world they had always known swiftly coming to a close. The glorious temple of Jerusalem was little more than a pile of broken stones with a familiar worship system buried under it. Followers of the new Christian cult of Judaism had scattered all around the Mediterranean and were in jeopardy from all sides, hated by former friends and new enemies alike. Their world was literally ending.

There are interpreters today who will tell you that Peter was actually referring to the “real” end times that our own generation will face. In a way, they’re right. In my own life, I have witnessed the end of all things several times; new technologies becoming old, old faith systems evolving into new ones, expanded views of what “loving my neighbor” really implies. 2015 saw a lot of changes and transitions in our church as well, and ending with the great hope of 2016 promising the beginning of a new adventure for all of us.

The real-world view outlined in 1 Peter addresses the multitude of endings and beginnings we have always faced and always will. New Year’s Day is the perfect time to consider the lessons we’ve learned from our past triumphs and challenges to help us create a better future. It’s up to us to make it a Happy New Year!

Prayer
May every ending in our lives signal a new beginning in our commitments to prayer, love for others, hospitality, and good use of our gifts in service through the grace of God.

If you would like to receive the Cathedral of Hope Devotion we would love to be able to send it to you directly. Sign up today to receive your own copy.

Support Cathedral of Hope

Get Married at CoH


We're in the News! Sexuality and Our Faith


Worship Today Bulletin


Amazon Smiles Gives Back To COH

Worship Information

Childcare is provided at all Sunday and Wednesday services.

Sundays
9 & 11 a.m. – Sunday Worship
9 & 11 a.m. – Children’s Church
11 a.m. – Youth Groups
1 p.m. – Sunday Worship in Spanish

Wednesdays
7:15 p.m. – PULSE Service

Location
5910 Cedar Springs Road | Dallas, TX  75235 (map)
Local: 214-351-1901 | Toll Free: 800-501-HOPE (4673)

Weekly Newsletter

Shift

Upcoming Events

WalkLogo.png12 Nov 2017
08:00AM - 05:00PM
The Walk
Choir.jpg18 Jan 2018
07:00PM - 09:00PM
Sanctuary Choir Rehearsal
Orchestra.jpg18 Jan 2018
07:00PM - 09:00PM
Cathedral of Hope Orchestra Rehearsal
middayprayer4sq.jpg20 Jan 2018
Legacy
21 Jan 2018
12:30AM - 02:30PM
Creative Arts Ministry